Step By Step Virtual PS Install: Install OS

This is a continuation of my virtual PeopleSoft installation.  In this step, we will install the operating system in to the virtual machine.  To see the complete list of steps, click here.

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Step By Step Virtual PS Install: Creating the Image

Click here for the complete list of articles

This is the first part in creating a virtual image with PeopleSoft HR installed.  We will use VMWare Server for the virtual machine and the host machine is a linux machine.  The PeopleSoft server will be Linux too so that everything is installed from downloads.  Of course, this will not be a production ready machine, but it should work great for learning and testing purposes.  You can always deviate from the instructions enough to use Windows or other supported tools if you wish.

VMWare server can be installed easily enough using these instructions:

Install VMware Server 1.0.6 on Ubuntu 8.04 “Hardy”

Installation on other host operating systems is not difficult.  You should be able to use any host operating system you like assuming that it is supported by VMWare.  You can download VMWare Server directly from here:

VMWare Server

Once installed, log in and click the create a new virtual machine — click the “Create a new virtual machine” button.

This will open the wizard to create the new machine.

Next, choose a typical image.

Next, choose Linux and Red Hat Enterprise Linux for the version.

Next, choose a name for the new virtual machine.

Next, choose a networking option.  If you wish to transfer files using Windows File Sharing, you may want to choose bridged.  This gives you the ability to access files from other computers/servers on the network.  If you are on a computer with multiple ethernet cards like a laptop with a wired and wireless card, you might want to choose NAT so that you don’t have to worry about which one should be mapped to the machine.

Next, choose a hard drive size.  It works best/easiest if you choose a huge size like 100G and don’t allocate now.  This makes the hard drive flexible, and you don’t have to worry about trying to make it larger later.  The image will take as much as it needs without crashing.  If you need to delete files and conserve space later you can and then shrink the hard drive to free up the space on the host.

Finally, click Finish, and you should have a new empty virtual computer.

Oracle “Templates”

InfoWorld just published an article about “VM Templates”.  I think VMWare uses the word Virtual Appliance.

I think it would be great to have the PeopleSoft applications offered as a “template”.  It might be comparable to the Single SignOn versions of the past maybe.  It would be really great for testing and all.

I created an idea on Mix.  If you agree, please vote for it.

Posted in VMWare. 1 Comment »

Tuxedo Install Error

I have been attempting to install Tuxedo on Oracle Enterprise Linux 5.  The installation presented several problems, and so, I thought it might be helpful to blog the fixes.

Both errors appear to be part of the InstallAnywhere installation system.  So, the fixes that I found were not specifically for Tuxedo or even PeopleSoft/Bea.

The first error output looked like this:

awk: error while loading shared libraries: libdl.so.2: cannot open shared object file: No such file or directory
dirname: error while loading shared libraries: libc.so.6: cannot open shared object file: No such file or directory
/bin/ls: error while loading shared libraries: librt.so.1: cannot open shared object file: No such file or directory
basename: error while loading shared libraries: libc.so.6: cannot open shared object file: No such file or directory
dirname: error while loading shared libraries: libc.so.6: cannot open shared object file: No such file or directory
basename: error while loading shared libraries: libc.so.6: cannot open shared object file: No such file or directory
hostname: error while loading shared libraries: libc.so.6: cannot open shared object file: No such file or directory
grep: error while loading shared libraries: libc.so.6: cannot open shared object file: No such file or directory
/tmp/install.dir.5362/Linux/resource/jre/bin/java:
error while loading shared libraries: libpthread.so.0: cannot open
shared object file: No such file or directory
Tuxedo 9.1 base installation complete

I found the fix here.  Basically, you comment out the part of the script that sets the LD_ASSUME_KERNEL variable.  You can’t just use any text editor or even vi because the file actually contains the binary installation files zipped up in it.  Instead, this sed command seems to work:

cd linux/sles9/base/
cp tuxedo91_32_SLES_9_x86.bin ../Install.bak
chmod +w tuxedo91_32_SLES_9_x86.bin
cat ../Install.bak | sed "s/export LD_ASSUME_KERNEL/#xport LD_ASSUME_KERNEL/" > tuxedo91_32_SLES_9_x86.bin

That fixed part of the problem.  But, I still received this error:

awk: cmd. line:6: warning: escape sequence `\.' treated as plain `.'
=======================================================

Installer User Interface Mode Not Supported

Unable to load and to prepare the installer in console or silent mode.

=======================================================

The awk… message looks like it is a problem, but that can be ignored.  A couple of searches showed that other people’s successful installs had this error message.  As best I can tell, the problem lies in the packaged version of Java.

To fix the problem, I first had to install Java.  GCJ comes installed by default.  I installed Sun’s Java 1.5 by downloading and installing jdk-1_5_0_16-linux-i586-rpm.bin.

Then, I found an article that explains how to override the JVM used by the installer.  To make this work, you need to edit (with either the vi command or the gedit command) the install.sh.  Change the line from (line #259):

        sh $INSTALL_BINARY -f $SILENT_INSTALL_FILE > $INSTALLER_OUTPUT;

to:

        sh $INSTALL_BINARY LAX_VM /usr/java/jdk1.5.0_16/bin/java -f $SILENT_INSTALL_FILE > $INSTALLER_OUTPUT;

After that fix, tuxedo finally installed for me!

Resources

HCM9.0: Resizing the Virtual Hard Drive

Once I reclaimed the hard drive space from my database, I had to shrink the hard drive in order to get my image smaller. Here is what I did.

Shrinking the Partition

I used a version of Linux called Knoppix. You can download it from here.

I never actually burned the image to CD. I just opened the properties of the CD drive in the virtual machine (while it was shutdown) and told it to use the iso image that I downloaded instead of the physical drive.

Determining the how small you can shrink the drive:

sudo ntfsresize --info /dev/sda1

Changing the size of the drive (test)

sudo ntfsresize --no-action --size=42831122432 /dev/sda1

Changing the size of the drive

sudo ntfsresize --size=42831122432 /dev/sda1

Changing the size of the partition

sudo fdisk /dev/sda

  • m for help
  • p for print (note the partition number and type/id)
  • d for delete
  • n for new partition (choose primary and same partition number and desired size +###M)
  • t for changing the partition type/id
  • p for print ( verify everything is the correct)
  • w for write

Shrinking an Unshrinkable Hard Drive

The only way that you can get a smaller hard drive if you can’t shrink the drive is to copy the data to a new virtual drive.

Copy the partition table.

sudo dd if=/dev/sda of=/dev/sdb bs=512 count=1

Copy the partition itself.

sudo dd if=/dev/sda1 of/dev/sdb1

Note: I had to reboot between copying the partition table and the actual partition.

Shrinking a Shrinkable Hard Drive

Shutdown the virtual machine.

From a command window run:

"C:\Program Files\VMware\VMware Server\vmware-mount " m: c:\VirtualMachines\HCM90\Database.vmdk
"C:\Program Files\VMware\VMware Server\vmware-vdiskmanager.exe" -p m:
"C:\Program Files\VMware\VMware Server\vmware-mount " m: /d
"C:\Program Files\VMware\VMware Server\vmware-vdiskmanager.exe" -k WindowsServer2003Standard.vmd

Note: to expand, you would use the -x option

"C:\Program Files\VMware\VMware Server\vmware-vdiskmanager.exe" -x 30Gb WindowsServer2003Standard.vmdk

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